Katie Meyer

Katie Meyer is WITF’s Capitol bureau chief, and she covers all things state politics for public radio stations throughout Pennsylvania. Katie came to Harrisburg by way of New York City, where she worked at Fordham University’s public radio station, WFUV, as an anchor, general assignment reporter, and co-host of an original podcast. A 2016 graduate of Fordham, she won several awards for her work at WFUV, including four 2016 Gracies. Katie is a native New Yorker, though she originally hails from Troy, a little farther up the Hudson River. She can attest that the bagels are still pretty good there.

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A freshman Philadelphia Democrat has set off a firestorm in Harrisburg by proposing a bill that would establish new mandatory minimum sentences. WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports it’s an approach much more in line with Republicans’ criminal justice platform than his own party’s.

Katherine McAdoo

Dueling visions of school reform are clashing in Harrisburg. WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports Republicans are trying to expand tax breaks for businesses that subsidize private school scholarships, and Democrats want to target new funding to the state’s neediest school districts.

Danya Henninger / WHYY/Billy Penn

Philadelphia’s city commissioners say they’re unimpressed with a threat by top State House Republicans to impeach them over a recent decision to count undated mail ballots.

WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports Republicans sent a letter warning of their impeachment plans after the commissioners voted to count undated mail ballots from the primary election earlier last month.

Andre Frueh

After Pennsylvanians approved a constitutional amendment giving the state legislature broad authority to end or change a governor’s disaster declarations, lawmakers are fast-tracking a bill aimed at dismantling many of Governor Tom Wolf’s pandemic mitigation efforts.

But WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports, there are still major disagreements about exactly how far their new powers extend.

Emma Lee / WHYY

Months into Pennsylvania’s vaccination effort, rates of people getting the shots vary wildly in different parts of the state. Some of the biggest differences can be seen as correlating with politics.

After all, Pennsylvania is divided. It’s home to one of the bluest congressional districts in the country, as well as dozens of counties that went overwhelmingly for Trump.

But, as WHYY Keystone Crossroads’ Katie Meyer reports, political extremes don’t cleanly predict the willingness to get shots. Take, for instance, two red, rural counties with very different outcomes.

Enayet Raheem

Pennsylvania lawmakers are getting ready for one of their biggest responsibilities – the once-in-a-decade redrawing of congressional and state House and Senate maps.

But, WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports, this year they are beginning the process blind – due to the pandemic, they still do not have the detailed census data they use to redraw districts.

Andre Frueh

The richest man in Pennsylvania is poised to spend millions of dollars influencing upcoming elections – all while trying to keep his name away from the political spotlight.

WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports Montgomery County billionaire Jeff Yass, a professional gambler turned powerful Wall Street trader, has recently put more than $10 million into school choice political action committees.

Andre Frueh

Almost a year ago, George Floyd’s death at the hands of police officer Derek Chauvin created a groundswell that, in Harrisburg, let to a surge of police reform proposals that was unprecedented in recent memory.

WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports that with Chauvin’s conviction, state lawmakers are taking stock of how far they’ve come – and how much further they’d still like to go.

Rachel Wisniewski / WHYY

In the wake of the tumultuous 2020 election, President Joe Biden has been calling for a greater sense of unity. But despite the rhetoric, deep political divisions still linger in communities across the country.

WHYY Keystone Crossroads’ Katie Meyer travelled to Upper Bucks County where a battle over school board control is reflecting much larger political divisions.

Emma Lee / WHYY

Another candidate is entering the Democratic primary race for Pennsylvania’s 2022 U.S. Senate election. WHYY’s Katie Meyer reports Philadelphia Senator Sharif Street, long assumed to be interested in the seat, has recently filed his statement of candidacy.

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