All Things Considered

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All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The word dinosaur literally means terrible lizard. And now scientists have discovered that the terrible lizards had terrible diseases, too. They say they've identified the first case of malignant cancer in a dinosaur bone.

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This dino was a plant eater adorned with a spiky shield on its head and a huge horn like a triceratops, but with one big horn instead of three.

Scientists from Canada's Royal Ontario Museum and McMaster University say they have identified malignant bone cancer in a dinosaur for the first time.

The new research was published earlier this week in the journal The Lancet Oncology.

The diagnosis? Osteosarcoma — an aggressive bone cancer — in the fibula, or lower leg bone, of a Centrosaurus apertus, a plant-eating, single-horned dinosaur that lived 76 to 77 million years ago.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STACEY VANEK SMITH, HOST:

In early April, the coronavirus was killing more than 700 New Yorkers every day. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced those spiking death tolls but added a note of hope - shutdown and social distancing were working.

STACEY VANEK SMITH, HOST:

The word dinosaur literally means terrible lizard. And now scientists have discovered that the terrible lizards had terrible diseases, too. They say they've identified the first case of malignant cancer in a dinosaur bone.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This dino was a plant eater adorned with a spiky shield on its head and a huge horn like a triceratops, but with one big horn instead of three.

Mississippi is heading for a title that no state would want: It is on track to overtake Florida to become the No. 1 state for new coronavirus infections per capita, according to researchers at Harvard.

The state already faces high levels of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and obesity.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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