Grand Ole Finale

May 31, 2019

In this here Grand Ole Finale, every answer ends with the letters O-L-E.

Heard on Trace Adkins And Carlene Carter: Cowboys And Cowpunks.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

It's time to crown our big winner. Let's bring back our finalists - Elizabeth Harrell, who's auditing a tap dance class for teenagers...

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: ...And Jarrod Walker, who dreams of getting a sweet Japanese van.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth and Jarrod, your final round is called Grand Ole Finale. Every correct answer will end with the letters O-L-E. And our big winner will receive an ASK ME ANOTHER Rubik's Cube signed by Trace Adkins and Carlene Carter. We rolled a 20-sided die backstage, and Elizabeth is going first. Here we go. Elizabeth, this is the larval stage of a frog's life cycle.

ELIZABETH HARRELL: Tadpole.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: That is correct. Jarrod, in criminal justice, it's the conditional early release of a prisoner.

JARROD WALKER: That'd be parole.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: That is correct. Elizabeth, this jazz pianist was the first African American to host a televised variety show.

HARRELL: Nat King Cole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jarrod, this actor played the titular role in "Lawrence Of Arabia" - three seconds.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUZZER)

EISENBERG: We're looking for Peter O'Toole. Jonathan, what's the score?

JONATHAN COULTON: The score is 2-1. Elizabeth is in the lead.

EISENBERG: Elizabeth, according to the Social Security Administration, this girl's name peaked in popularity in 1982.

HARRELL: Nicole?

EISENBERG: (Laughter) That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: It was the sixth most popular. Now, it is 218th.

HARRELL: Ooh. Ouch.

EISENBERG: Jarrod, it's a federally recognized Native American tribe in Oklahoma and Florida.

WALKER: Seminoles.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth, founded in Hawaii, this agricultural corporation is known for its pineapples, fruit cups and bananas.

HARRELL: Dole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jarrod, this three-letter-word associated with bullfighting is sung repeatedly by fans at soccer matches and other sporting events around the world.

WALKER: I'll try not to stutter but - ole.

EISENBERG: There you go. That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth, every October 23 at 6:02 a.m., chemistry students celebrate this animal mascot and Avogadro's number.

HARRELL: Oh, goodness. Chemistry is not my strongest suit. I do not know.

EISENBERG: The answer we were looking for is mole. Jarrod, a number of avocados are mashed up to make this Mexican dish, which costs extra at Chipotle.

(LAUGHTER)

WALKER: That'd be guacamole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth, PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch are all examples of this home electronic device used to play video games.

HARRELL: Console.

EISENBERG: Yes, that is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jarrod, this garment is worn around the neck by clergy members or some college graduates - three seconds.

WALKER: The only clothes I can think of is, like, camisole. That's not it - camisole. You wear it at graduation. Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I don't know what you're graduating from, but...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: The answer we were looking for is stole. OK. Jonathan, we only have a few questions left. How are our contestants doing?

COULTON: Well, Elizabeth still has that one-point lead. It is now 5-4.

EISENBERG: Elizabeth, Bon Appetit says this leafy vegetable is the best green to use in Italian wedding soup.

HARRELL: OK. Leafy vegetable - and it ends in O-L-E. And I'm drawing a blank.

EISENBERG: The answer is escarole.

HARRELL: Oh, nope - would not have come up with that.

EISENBERG: OK, good to know. Jarrod, Merriam-Webster defines this word as, quote, "extravagant exaggeration."

WALKER: Hyperbole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: All right. We're on one last question for each of you. Jonathan, what's the situation?

COULTON: The score is now tied, Ophira. It's getting serious in here.

EISENBERG: Oh, my goodness. Elizabeth, in 2019, scientists compiled the first image of this space phenomenon.

HARRELL: Black hole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Jarrod, you have to answer this question correctly to tie it up and force a tiebreaker.

EISENBERG: Jarrod, Baltimore's Major League Baseball team is named for this bird species.

WALKER: That'd be the oriole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: All right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Yup. Grab those buzzers. Here is your tiebreaker - marine mammals, such as dolphins and whales, use this opening to breathe.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Elizabeth.

HARRELL: Blowhole.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: What a close game - well done, Jarrod. Thank you so much. Congratulations, Elizabeth. And that's our show. Our podcast drops each Friday. Listen and subscribe. ASK ME ANOTHER's house musician Jonathan Coulton.

COULTON: Hey. My name anagrams to thou jolt a canon.

EISENBERG: Our puzzles were written by Carol Lee (ph), Cara Weinberger and senior writer Karen Lurie (ph) with additional material by Ashley Brooke Roberts and Emily Winter (ph). Our senior supervising producer is Rachel Neil (ph). ASK ME ANOTHER is produced by Mike Katzif, Travis Larchuk, Kiara Powell (ph), Nancy Saechao, Rommel Wood and our intern Hannah Meyer Katkin (ph), along with Steve Nelson and Anya Grundmann. We were recorded by Damon Whittemore. Thanks to Nashville Public Radio WPLN 90.3, TPAC's Polk Theater, the Grand Ole Opry...

COULTON: Great Paula Hedren.

EISENBERG: ...And our production partner WNYC. I'm her ripe begonias.

COULTON: Ophira Eisenberg.

EISENBERG: And this was ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.