Business Is Booming For Miami Company That Cleans Medical Facilities

Apr 10, 2020
Originally published on April 10, 2020 8:18 am
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NOEL KING, HOST:

Some of the most essential workers right now are people who literally confront the coronavirus when they sanitize public spaces. Antonio Martinez (ph) has a franchise with the cleaning company Anago. He's been running his business in Miami for 13 years. He says he has a lot of clients.

ANTONIO MARTINEZ: Medical facilities, doctor office, regular office - I have a car dealer, a hotel, exterminators (laughter).

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

He normally visits sites during the day and trains his employees how to clean properly. His business is doing way more deep cleaning than ever before.

MARTINEZ: It's crazy (laughter). Everybody wants their desk, their doors, the elevators, their handles, the refrigerator - everything that everybody touch on a daily basis, they want everything disinfected, which is not common.

KING: Because Martinez cleans medical facilities, he already had the masks and the gloves. But as COVID-19 spread, he went to hardware stores and bought full-body suits for extra protection. And he's told his employees - if you're not wearing PPE, don't work. They get paid hourly, and now what they're doing takes twice as long.

MARTINEZ: People think that disinfecting is just taking, like, a Lysol wipe and clean the surface. It doesn't work like that. You need to spray the entire office. You wait between a minute to two minutes for the chemical to kill the germ, and then you wipe it down. That's the way it's supposed to be done.

GREENE: Antonio Martinez is 49 years old. He has two children. And his family is worried about him.

MARTINEZ: Especially my wife - don't go; be careful. But I have to go. I'm like a captain of any ship, and I want my employees to see that I'm there for them, for our customers.

GREENE: Martinez says with millions more Americans now unemployed, he and his colleagues feel lucky to be working.

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