Andrew Limbong

Andrew Limbong is a reporter and producer for NPR's Arts Desk, where he reports, produces, and mixes arts and culture pieces of all kinds. Previously, he was a producer and director for Tell Me More. He originally started at NPR in 2011 as an intern for All Things Considered.

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Two different philanthropic arms of the Sackler family have announced they will temporarily stop all new gifts in the United Kingdom.

The Sacklers are major donors to museums, galleries and theaters in the U.K. and the U.S — between 2013 and 2017, the Mortimer D. Sackler Foundation alone gave away more than $6 million, according to tax records.

Arata Isozaki spent much of his childhood in the shadow of World War II. As a native of the city of Oita, the Japanese architect grew up just across a slim body of water from Hiroshima, where the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb — and he says he saw firsthand the ease with which proud human achievements could be leveled.

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Trevor Paglen writes the kinds of books that get you into weird conversations with strangers. He takes the kinds of pictures that are slightly unnerving until you read the title card, and then it becomes a regular amount of unnerving.

He also just sent a giant inflatable mirror up into space.

That last one is just the latest art piece in a career all about being watched by things you can't see.

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This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.

Editor's note: The following story contains some frank discussion of suicide.


The opening lines to "Adam's Song" aren't particularly subtle:

I never thought I'd die alone
I laughed the loudest, who'd have known

Rob Base and DJ E-Z Rock's debut album, It Takes Two, was released 30 years ago this month. It contains one of the most defining singles in hip-hop, anchored by the unmistakable hook: "It takes two to make a thing go right / It takes two to make it outta sight." The epochal riff is a sample from Lyn Collins 1972 single "Think (About It)." Collins died in 2005, but thanks to this hip-hop rework of her single, her name is canonized in music history.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Paul Taylor, one of the most prolific and influential choreographers in the world of modern dance, died Wednesday, Aug. 29. The cause was renal failure, the Paul Taylor Dance Foundation confirmed. He was 88.

The movements Taylor created on stage were inspired by everyday people doing everyday things, including doing nothing at all. It was an approach that at first turned people away — but he eventually turned them around.

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