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Pete Hamill was a tabloid man: a columnist and top name on the masthead, mostly for the New York Post and Daily News, who wrote punchy, passionate, lyrical chronicles of city life, often for people who had to read them while they held onto a strap, standing on the Number 7 train from Queens.

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Tomorrow is the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki. It was the second time nuclear weapons were used in war and also the last. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel has the story of the bombing and why decisions made afterwards are still a problem today.

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And now it's time for sports.

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SIMON: Sports in the age of coronavirus, bubbles, testing, quarantines and just enough time for a little game now and then. Howard Bryant of ESPN joins us.

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Kathleen Edwards had devoted fans and a successful career, with hits on the Billboard Top 40 charts and songwriting awards. But after her last album in 2012, she walked away from the music business. In fact, she opened a cafe in the suburbs of Ottawa, Canada, called Quitters Coffee.

Nate Marshall has a new collection of poems. It's called Finna, and he says the title of this new book comes from the Southern phrase "fixing to, right, which is like 'about to.' One of the things that I love about that, and that is a kind of central thing in the book, is it's all about what happens next. It's this thing that is informed by history, but that is all about looking forward, all about possibility. That's sort of what I hope the poems do, is that they I hope they sort of wrestle with history, but also look forward."

The series Upright opens with a man hauling an upright piano in a trailer across the bare Australian landscape. He's frazzled and alone at the wheel, guzzling beer and gobbling pills. He gets a text message: "Mate. Time is running out. Don't duck this up."

Ah, spell-check.

Then he drives into a ditch, hears his piano bleat, and the shouts of an angry, profane 16-year-old he's just run into. Upright is the story of two strangers, Lucky and Meg, who take off across the expanse of Australia, scheming, swearing, pilfering, and becoming vital to each other.

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How's your Latin? Satis, satis? Well, Spencer Alexander McDaniel's Latin is really, really good.

So you're casting a delightful new children's movie and you need a loveable circus ringleader ... who do you turn to but the homicidal meth kingpin from Breaking Bad? Cranston stars in The One and Only Ivan which comes out on Disney+ on August 21.

Since many of us know Cranston from Breaking Bad, we've invited him to play a game called "Braking ... good!" Three questions about safe driving, inspired by classic driver's education films of yesteryear.

Click the audio link above to find out how he does.

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